Sunday, May 17, 2015

A Day Trip to the California Coast


On the last day of National Pro-Life T-Shirt Week (Monday, May 4, 2015) my husband was able to take the day off work and we went on a family road trip to the coast!


On the drive over we were able to take pictures for Task 448: Standing at the back of a train caboose (2 points)... 


… at the visitor center for the Oregon Caves… 
(We considered driving out to the actual caves - the Oregon Caves are one of the 113 National Monuments but, after a vote, we decided to continue on to the coast.) 


… Task 461: At a "Welcome to" your state sign."(6 points)...


… Task 309: Standing with an entrance to a tunnel visible behind you (3 points)…




… and even Task 193: At a Zoo or Aquarium (4 points)…


… before finally arriving at the California coast, for Task 227: In front or inside of any of the 113 United States National Monuments (8 points).  


Did you know that the whole California Coast line is a National Monument of the United States? According to Wikipedia, "This monument ensures the protection of all islets, reefs and rock outcroppings from the coast of California to a distance of 12 nautical miles, along the entire 840-mile long California coastline."



We headed south through the Redwoods National and State Parks, and past the wild elk at Elk Meadow, to the lovely city of Trinidad and the Trinidad Head Light for Task 180: Standing in front of a real lighthouse (5 points).



"Trinidad Head, a large domed prominence rising to a height of 380 feet, is connected to the mainland only on its northern end, thus forming the beautiful and natural Trinidad Bay on its eastern side. On the bluffs overlooking the bay, Trinidad, the oldest town on the northern California coast, was founded on April 8, 1850. Early on, the town was a vital link between ships anchored in the bay and miners testing their luck in the Klamath, Trinity, Salmon River, and Gold Bluff Mines. As the gold rush slowed, Trinidad Bay, like most bays along the Redwood Coast, became home to multiple sawmills. To aid vessels engaged in the lumber trade, a lighthouse was proposed for the ocean-facing side of the headland in 1854." - Source



A little history from Wikipedia:

The low, square, brick tower, painted white, was built in 1871.The light is only 20 feet (6.1 m) above ground, but the headland on which it stands gives it an elevation of 196 feet (60 m) above the sea. Despite the great height above the sea, heavy seas have been known to reach it. In 1913, the keeper made the following report:

"At 4:40 p. m. I observed a sea of unusual height. When it struck the bluff the jar was very heavy. The lens immediately stopped revolving. The sea shot up the face of the bluff and over it, until the solid sea seemed to me to be on a level with where I stood in the lantern. The sea itself fell over onto the top of the bluff and struck the tower about on a level with the balcony. The whole point between the tower and the bluff was buried in water."

The wave he described was the highest recorded wave on the coast. After the sea struck the lighthouse and extinguished the light, service was restored in four hours by Lightkeeper F.L. Harrington, the keeper from 1888 to 1916.


Next we headed down to the sandy beach! 





We had some more tasks we were hoping to complete including...




… Task 229: Spell "LIFE" in sand with letters that are at least 4 feet in length (4 points).


… Task 426: Dancing in a puddle of water (3 points)…


… and Task 441: Next to a sand castle that is at least 2 feet high or 4 feet wide (5 points)… 


almost purchased an inexpensive kite at Walmart a couple days before (Task 221: Flying a kite.) and really wish I would have! The beach would have been the perfect place to fly a kite and the weather was perfect… Instead we just spent the rest of the evening enjoying the sand and the beautiful views. 








We didn't want to leave, but everyone was getting hungry and it was time to try and squeeze in a couple more tasks before the contest ended and then find somewhere to eat dinner. 


We noticed a couple restaurants on our way to the beach and decided to try The Lighthouse Grill. Thankfully we got there just before they closed! I didn't expect to be able to eat out and packed along a few things for myself (I'm still on a strict Auto-Immune Protocol + Paleo diet. Today is already Day 75!) and was so excited to see the menu! They were so willing to work with me and I was able to order a Grass-Fed Beef burger wrapped in lettuce, topped with bacon, and some onions and mushrooms sautéed in olive oil! Yay!!! I want to go back to Trinidad just to visit The Lighthouse Grill again! ;) 


Sean and the older boys also had burgers. The girls and younger boys all shared fish & chips, made with fresh, local fish, and hand cut fries. Mmmmmm! 


The Lighthouse Grill is also home of the "Mashed Potato Cone!" Sean ordered one to share with the kids and it looked sooooo good! He ordered the "Savory Waffle Cone with Mashed Potatoes with Beef Gravy and added Cheese and Bacon." Next time they want to try it "All the Way" with the Beef Brisket as well.


After dinner, and before starting the long drive back home, we stopped to watch the sunset at Patrick's Point State Park near Wedding Rock. On the drive home we offered another rosary for an end to abortion. 



It was a beautiful end to our week of tasks for National Pro-Life T-Shirt Week and our efforts to learn, pray, and do more to protect and defend the sanctity of all human life from creation to natural death.

"We ourselves feel that what we are doing is just a drop in the ocean. But the ocean would be less because of that missing drop." 
Mother Teresa